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by the university of illinois. >> up next from c-span's "washington journal," indiana governor mitch daniels presents his thoughts on the current political and economic landscape. governor daniels recounts his handling of indiana's former deficit. his promotion of private sector employment and his argument for fiscal restraint. this is about 50 minutes. >> and here is the cover of governor mitch daniels upcoming book. it publishes in a month or so. he is the governor of indiana. the title, "keeping the republic" saving america by trusting americans. governor daniels now joins us in indianapolis to take your callsr governor daniels, as former, somebody who has worked here ins washington and spent eight years in indiana, how would you describe federal government and states, economically? guest: i think in most states we are headed in completely different directions. we have been asking the question what can state governments do or do better or do faster or maybe stop doing to make it more likely that the next job, the next investment -- the federal government for the last two years gets up and
your calls. governor daniels, you spent eight years in indiana. how would you describe the relationship between the federal government and states, economically? guest: i think in most states we are headed in completely different directions. we have been asking the question what can state governments do or do better or do faster or maybe stop doing to make it more likely that the next job, the next investment -- the federal government for the last two years gets up and thinks what we do to put another barrier, another regulation, another uncertainty, another tax on the people who would like to hire people and grow this economy? we states balance our budgets no matter what and take care of our food usual duties -- financial duties. host: today, our system of governance is being challenged by china and other authoritarian cultures that have generated faster economic growth in anything we have seen capable of. ho why did you write that? guest: i think it is a statement of fact. it has been written widely and said by the leaders of these countries. the only way to have a system that lists hu
welked t were back at home. as they travel across the state of indiana and talk to people from all different categories of work engagement small to medium to large businesses, homeowners, other constituents one thing came through loud and clear, ando that was i needed to listen to i them more than they needed to listen to me. what was on their mind i hope isobs what the president will beecau hearing as he travels across the country to talk about his jobsthe plan because j clearly on the lack minds of the american people was the jobs and the lack of jobs for many who werene struggling through a very very difficult time of unemployment. that students are graduating from college with noro place to pe go.la o people in -- were being laid off or terminated. unable to find new work. clearly we have a jobs crisis in this country. it has lasted now for some time. we have been in a deept. recession hopefully pulling out of that but the latest indicators are that things are pretty stagnant and in factin thet is t latest facet -- facts tha
the roll. mr. coats: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. senator coats mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the call of the -- mr. coats: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: we all heard the president speak to a joint session of congress last week about his proposal to bring forward a jobs bill that was released this morning, and the president indicated that he wanted to take his case to the people. and i'm glad he's doing so. i hope that as he travels about the country, i think he'll be hearing what many of us heard during the august recess when we were back at home as i traveled across the state of indiana and talked to people from all different categories of work engagement, small to medium to large businesses, homeowners, other constituents. one thing came through loud and clear, and that was i needed to listen to them more than they needed to listen to me. what was on their mind i hope is what the president will be hearing as he travels across the countr
to interpenetrate that's the highest thing we long for her. one of the beautiful examples i book by indiana university, scientist who hofstadter was married to a and when their kids were five and care was dead, but hofstadter was still one day happened to have just as he had done many days he happened to glance at her face as he was what he wrote in his book, and a strange loop about that experience. i looked lips so deeply that i felt i peered out once i tears flowed, that's me, simple words brought back many feelings i'd had before about the fusion of her souls but the fact the core of both hopes and notion those hopes were not separate but just one hope, one clear thing that kind of unit i dimly imagine before being married and having children. i realized o'carroll had died, that core piece had not tied it off, but it had determinedly in used to say we suffer our way to the wisdom which is confirmed as a scientist scientific durocher thinks that ways much deeper than in a shallow and less important way, seen, educational forums suffered her way the shallow view dominant in our society as
incorporate some students. our campaign 2012 bas it is visiting a high school in indiana, until the next 45 minutes we will hear from 15 students participating in the program. the high school is located in northwest indiana, and over 1000 students attend. thank you for preparing the students for the call in, and comcast cable for sponsoring the visit. our first student is jesse. >> how would you suggest to financially restore the united states postal service besides cutting back employment and benefits? guest: we think it is simple. there will be a slow, gradual change in the post office that needs to be done. we recognize there are people that will not use the post office and probably never use it again, but there is $65 billion of revenue by people that are utilizing the postal service. they should be done gradually. they should be done humanely, was consideration of the poor communities and rural areas, so they did not lose their service. that could be done by using these over-funding, the money ained.as been dreame that is the humane way of doing this. you have to remember, if you read
to these kind of voter id laws, when it upheld the indiana voter id law in the crawford case. despite the fact that there wasn't one iota, not one, not even an inch of evidence, introduced that law that anything that helps and prevents voter fraud. following 2010 when so many people sent home, think about it, folks. 25 million people who voted in 2008 did not vote in 2010. and out of that 25 million, it's estimated majority of those were obama voters. so what happened was that this open the floodgates for these republican legislatures to take control, and what they've been doing ever since is instead of, instead of doing their job, instead of dealing with homelessness, instead of dealing with foreclosures, their number one priority has been to pass these voter restriction laws. and the purpose is so that they continue to have political domination by saying, okay, in 2010 you chose not to vote. but in 2012, you're not going to be able to vote. we are going to slam the door and ensure our political dominance. so what they are doing is passing these laws. we are saying you can only vote if you ha
are also at risk in these struggles in band, ohio, indiana and states like new jersey, where brother csonka comes out of the private sector in new jersey is here tonight in the cwa vice president had a huge rally in schaake and were confronted with chris christie. i don't know if you saw his mug on the cover of "the sunday times" magazine a week or two ago. the guy has a voracious appetite for a number of rings. contract concessions are among them. in new jersey not these other states on the cwa, ast, uaw all following the lead of seiu have organized in toto five, 600,000 home-based workers, home health areas, home day care providers in the last 10 years, biggest source of new union membership and has gained a very precarious foothold in the public sector for these workers who work in nontraditional work places, predominately female, nonwhite, often immigrant workers. many in the case of our joint bargaining unit, child care providers in new jersey would ask me, still trapped in the workfare. women are in the temporary assistance. so lost in this debate, if you can call it that in some medi
-organized union members who are also at risk in these struggles in wisconsin, in ohio, in indiana and states like new jersey where our cwa friends, brother brook comes out of new jersey, is here tonight and cwa vice president, had a huge rally up in trenton confront with the that charming fellow, chris christie. i don't know if you saw his mug on the cover of the sunday times a week or two. the guy has a voracious appetite, clearly, for a number of things. contracted sections are among them. but in new jersey and all these other states cwa, afsme, the uft all following the lead of seiu have organized in total five, 600,000 home health workers, home daycare providers. in the last ten years, biggest source of new dwhriewn onmembership -- union membership and have gained a precarious foothold in the public sector for these workers who work in nontraditional workplaces, predominantly female, nonwhite, often immigrant workers. many, as in the case of our joint bargaining unit child care providers in new jersey with afsme still trapped in the post-clinton world of work. there are women on temporary ass
originally from evansville, indiana, for "congressional quarterly." next question, mr. starks. >> host: yes, one of the reasons it's been difficult for congress to cut grants is because police, firefighters and rescue personnel are a powerful constituency, and the idea of saying no to them seems ridiculous to them, seems like it would be bad for them politically. i'm wondering, though, how much the wireless carriers who also have their own interests in spectrum, they have their own political weight to bring to bear. how much in this spectrum debate are they allies and how much are they the enemies? >> guest: well, i think some of each. the, some of the major carriers are very supportive of our efforts because they have a vision where it would be beneficial to the public, the public safety community and to their business interests for us to partner with them at some point to build out this nationwide network. those that have that vision, of course, we're very pleased with that. unfortunately, there are some in that commercial world that are looking at it what we believe is more selfishly to
officer and ten as the homeland security reporter originally from evansville indiana congressional quarterly. next question mr. stark. >> yes, if you look it's difficult for congress because the police and firefighters and rescue personnel are a powerful constituency and it's ridiculous politically. i'm wondering how much the wireless carriers who also have their own spectrum have their own political weight to bring to bear, how much in the spectrum debate are the allies and how much are they the enemies? >> i think some of each. some of the major carriers are very supportive of the efforts because they had a video where it would be beneficial for the public community than to their business interest for. of course we are very pleased with that and there are some in the commercial world that are looking at it that what we believe ms. moore selfishly to deal with their particular needs as a company and when that happens that is surprising to us. we have more support than we had detractors, and that's very helpful. >> i would never consider any of the public safety communications carr
indiana is waiting here. but just a few minutes to speak to it, if i may. the senator from texas has introduced an amendment that really takes an unprecedented step here in the senate, and that is the step of actually requiring the president by mandate with respect to one weapons system, one singular amendment to sell a specific weapon to another country. specifically, the senator wants to take the unprecedented step of requiring the president of the united states to sell 66 new f-16 fighter aircraft to taiwan. now, the amendment mandates the sale of these new aircraft despite the fact that just yesterday, the president and the administration notified the congress of their intention to provide taiwan with nearly nearly $6 billion additional in goods and services on top of money that they have already provided to taiwan, including, mr. president, upgrades to taiwan's current fleet of 145 f-16's. now, i will stand by my record of 26-plus years here of voting for the appropriate defense relationship with respect to taiwan and china, and we have always respected the taiwan relations act,
h caused destruction in states like texas and kentucky, tennessee and indiana. and it's what we have to do again. the house republicans failed tod provide funding. farmers, economic development, long-term support for local communities to rebuild. that's what you do when you havo a crisis or an accident. and there can't be any debate about the help that's required in many all 50 states.up it requires bipartisan support because you can't get it doneth with only one party.. every state has experienced the disaster in recent years, and this year alone federal disasters have been declared in 48 states. fema's working in every one of those states to help communities rebuild and recover.and if they have the resources. if they don't, they won't be on the job. and people will continue tothe suffer.eopl so if house republicans get t their way, every state is on the verge of disaster. incredibly, the house proposale pays for disaster relief by taking money from advanced technological development that'll help our automobile industry, for instance, and create jobs. job here in the senate we've go
to access that. host: indiana, you're on. caller: first, the chart you had at first seemed to add up to more than 100%. i was wondering how you reconcile that and how do you account for things like degradation like when the exxon valdez sank g.d.p. in aalaska went up because of the cost of recovery. host: thank you, john. guest: good catch. you must be an account yourself. what i left out of that chart is imports. they are counted as a negative in g.d.p., because they are not domestic production. and we measure it by final sales. with respect to your second question of degradation of the environment, that's an issue that's been kicking around citizens u.s. accounts were founded in the great depression in the 1930's, and yes, indeed, people recognize the founder of the, that that is a net deduction that should be taken against production, and just as we depreciate and use capital in production, we should do the same for natural resources. the difficult thing is how do weness economics of pollution? most oil wells are not bought or sold or developed by the companies themselves so, there's no p
sucking up when i say that. i like to think of myself as the indiana jones of libraries on the do the decimal system looking for interesting books. the duodecimal system created by the way by melville dewey, who was a rabid anti-semite. in fact i love it so much that give me a choice between a night with cade blanch at or a night locked away in the library of congress and i would take the night with blanchett in a heartbeat but i do love libraries. [laughter] i do love libraries. i thought i would talk a little bit about this book of mine, in the garden of beasts, and what came about. i'm a little alarmed that within the publishing company, crounse, a publishing company, within the company people -- i guess they are inherently lazy. they call the book almost now exclusively by its acronym which is itbog which sounds a little bit to me like something a cat coughed up. i realize if you say itgob you sound just like the girl possessed in the exorcist. [laughter] at first glance this may not seem like my kind of book necessarily. here it is. this book is set in 1933, 34 in nazi german
, not the former senator from indiana, but someone who really could stand up to him. of course rumsfeld and cheney could stand up to him, and they did. largely marginalized on any issue that he previously from his military experience would have been caught up in. understand, the law ever since 1947, creating the job of secdef, says it has to be from civilian life, and that means you can't have served in active duty within the past ten years. an exception was made. a law was passed so that general marshall could serve, but it takes another act of congress to waive that requirement. paul would not have been in the running anyway, just because of that legal technicality. >> assuming there is pork and waste in the defense budget, building major weapon systems we don't need it or that don't work, have there been the defense been any secretaries of defense with the courage to abolish what the systems? >> well, yes, there have been secretaries to have canceled different programs at different times. i think it is interesting that virtually every recent republican secretary of defense picked one just to pr
throughout the heartland, in indiana or illinois. senator roberts talked about agriculture. in north dakota we've got more cattle than people. i think we've got three million cattle. right now to send them into south korea, we pay more than 40% tariff. how do we compete with argentina or australia in that situation? this is an opportunity. this is absolutely an opportunity. we need to reach out and grab it with both hands. we've got the president right now saying hey, pass those trade agreements. absolutely. please get them down here to us. we've worked so hard to make sure we've cleared all the hurdles, t.a.a. or whatever else is required. bring those trade agreements to us. we stand ready to pass them. and with that, i'd like to -- a senator: would you yield for a second? mr. hoeven: yes. a senator: you're talk to go your constituents about this. i'm sure all of us have stories about this. mr. portman: this morning we had a weekly caucus. there were 12 pork producers from ohio. their number one issue was trade and tkpwregt -- getting these agreements done. they have to have international
and indiana and virginia, they go out and they fight this good fight and to the best they can. as far as nobility, sure, i think that is one reason we don't have a famous great attorney like clarence darrow any more. you tend to get wealthy and as a trial lawyer when you win your first big case, and maybe tara would have ended up this way too but you don't end up representing the attorney for the. maybe was the fact dodaro fell so far in los angeles and had to come back that led them to take a series of cases and is 50s and 60s that we remember him by. i think success store -- spoils great lawyers. >> my name is matt harrington. i think the innocence project is someone representing oj and the work he does in capital defense who is living up to that high standard. i was just going to say i would -- i'm a lawyer and two books one was irving stone's book and very much styles himself as darrow successor. in dealing with darrow as there is this aching desire i have always had to find some place where he feels bad about driving those jurors. [laughter] and i'm wondering if anywhere in that
governor from new jersey, lee hamilton, former democratic congressman from indiana. they were co-chairs of the 9/11 commission. gentlemen, welcome. >> guest: thank you. >> host: my first question is a very simple one, why the book and why now. and i ask the question because two years ago the 9/11 commission report came out. it was a gripping account of what had happened with the whole 9/11 phenomenon, a roaring bestseller as i remember. now you have this book which i found very interesting, clearly written, candid and, i think, important. but i didn't find anything brand new about the 9/11 phenomenon, the attack on the united states. so i'm kind of wondering what is it, therefore, that you felt was so necessary to produce "without precedent," we'll start with the governor. >> guest: for one thing, other people are starting to write about us. [laughter] characterize us, so when that start toss happen, it's going to depend on who's going to write the account. that was one reason. another reason, frankly, is because we thought it was interesting. we went through experiences probably
that. i like to think of myself as the indiana jeans of jones of libraries repelling down the 900 levels of dewey desmat system looking for a book. the dewey decimal system created by melville dewey who was rabid anti-semite. i love libraries, if you were to give me a choice between a night with cate blanchett or a night locked alone in the library of congress, i would take the night with cate blanchett in a heartbeat but, but, i do love libraries. i do love libraries. i thought i would talk about this new book of mine, "in the garden of beasts" and how it came about. i'm alarmed within my publishing company, crown publishinging within the company they're inherently lazy, they call the book almost exclusively by its acronym, itgob. which sounds like something a cat coughed up. if you say itgob while growling you sound just like the possessed girl in the exorcist. take that home with you, you know? [laughter] at first glance this may not seem like my kind of book necessarily. here it is. this book is set in 1933-34 in nazi germany. hitler, the whole deal. here's the thing, this is
followed arizona and enacted their own laws. my home state of georgia has, alabama has, utah has, indiana has, right? and in each of those cases, courts -- well, except for alabama in each of those cases courts have enjoined the enforcement of the act on the doctrine of preemption. alabama has stayed its decision while it further studies the decision so no court has upheld one of these statutes. national association of state legislature, national state legislatures report that over 30 states of significant immigration legislation pending and so there's an obvious need for guidance here. the one caveat i would offer is that this involves a question of preemption. right? the issue in these cases is not racial profiling, a lot of public discussion centers on that but the issue in these cases is whether or not these laws are consistent with federal statutes. and the court might well think that congress is going to get around to addressing this issue and it's congress that ought to be providing the guidance. so with that caveat in mind where they might sit back for a while and see if congress
waters recently made a comment up in detroit, and representative andre carson, democrat of indiana, of indianapolis made this comment recently. i want to get your reaction. >> we have seen change in congress. the tea party itself has changed. this is beyond symbolic change. this is the effort that we are seeing of jim crow. >> host: ellis cose? traneighty we are looking at political rhetoric here, and political rhetoric seems to be extreme. i don't think that certainly in terms of the articulated public positions you're going to fight any tea party leadership saying we want second class citizens, or that we want people in sticking. that's jus just a part of the rhetoric. and i think many of them are sincere about that. they recognize that this is a different america, that you can't take america back to the 1940s, to the 1950s. but at the same time i think what they are expressing is they are frustrated. they're not quite sure where they fit in. they are not quite sure where things are going. and they are angry. but now i don't think they'll organize themselves into lynch mobs. >> h
and what has not been done in a given area. i visited the fusion center in the state of indiana. i've done it in a couple other areas and i think they represent probably the best hope for giving you the kind of response you want on unity of effort in any given crisis. >> gentlelady from new york, my colleague, ms. clarke. mr. clark from michigan. >> thank you, mr. chair. my question to the entire panel is how can the department of homeland security best judge in urban areas risk of an attack based on the assessment that it uses now? i represent metropolitan detroit. we have a large international airport hub. that airport was the destination of the plane that the christmas day bomber attempted to blow up. there is a strong likelihood that our region could be the target of another attack. now in addition to the likelihood of an attack, the department also needs to look at the consequences of an attack. metropolitan metropolitan detroit did not use that as an example. we have a large population center. we have a border that is water, that is also the busiest international border crossing in t
in gary, indiana. there were not many american educated doctors who were where it -- who were willing to work in gary, indiana in the late 1970's. the economy was collapsing and it was a very poor and crime- ridden area. employer contributions, then and now, they are disproportionate for foreign doctors. u.s.-born doctors will not go there. different studies -- let me remarks briefly on immigration and economic growth. when it comes to high skilled immigration, there really is consensus among labor economists on the benefits of high skilled immigration could there probably is not with regard -- skilled immigration. there probably is not with regard to lower skilled immigration. in terms of fiscal effect coming terms of high skills contributed vs. what they use in public services, they actually pay off over their lifetime over $100,000 in net benefits to u.s. taxpayers in terms of what they contribute more vs. what they use up in services. on competitiveness, we first mentioned higher productivity. but there is another aspect, which is even more compelling. it is not just a one time ch
in a given area. i visited the fusion center in the state of indiana. i've done it in a couple other areas and i think they represent probably the best hope for giving you the kind of response you want on unity of effort in any given crisis. >> gentlelady from new york, my colleague, ms. clarke. mr. clark from michigan. >> thank you, mr. chair. my question to the entire panel is how can the department of homeland security best judge in urban areas risk of an attack based on the assessment that it uses now? i represent metropolitan detroit. we have a large international airport hub. that airport was the destination of the plane that the christmas day bomber attempted to blow up. there is a strong likelihood that our region could be the target of another attack. now in addition to the likelihood of an attack, the department also needs to look at the consequences of an attack. metropolitan metropolitan detroit did not use that as an example. we have a large population center. we have a border that is water, that is also the busiest international border crossing in terms of trade in north amer
for this. but we're talking about indiana, illinois, we're talking about florida and louisiana and california and all across our country where we are seeing communities have the opportunity to retool plants that would be idle, empty, an eye sore and be able to bring those back with new technologies that are going to get us off of foreign oil and are creating jobs. 41,000 jobs so far, and the real insult to me, as i look at what's happening to people in my state ands cross the country, is that they are poised to to be giving out up to 11 additional loans to partner with business in the next couple of mojtses that will create somewhere between 40,000 and 50,000 new jobs. saving or creating new jobs in the next few weeks and right when this is about to happen, the house republicans are saying, oh, no, in order to help the folks in joplin, missouri, who are wiped out as a community, we want to make sure that we're not creating jobs in michigan. that we're not creating jobs in indiana, ohio, illinois, florida, louisiana, california, minnesota, where ever it is. but somehow we have t
has done, great examples on the internet. indiana -- >> those are american companies. >> i've had obviously an iphone. i think apple, google, facebook wonders examples where it's like, you know, you're sort of lakers are competition? you're not even sure. [laughter] >> how is it that america is able to innovate so well given all the challenges we have great companies like that performing so well? >> in other words, the nation is a great innovator. how do you explain that? how does i continue to have been? >> it's kind of like a statement about democracy. you know, it's a bad system, but it's the least bad. well, the united states is the lease that encourage innovation. in silicon valley actually everything is particularly good at encourage innovation. the silicon valley orders of magnitude that is in any place in the world for creating new companies and fostering innovation is quite remarkable. so i don't think we actually need to worry about another country out there out innovativeness. i think like him a like him salinization in the world comes from america. it's true. a ridicul
market share indiana states will be a part with market share in other part of all. i also expecting more and more companies were dodging this worldwide. and i'd to believe that this will be a win-win-win situation for the u.s., for china, and also for worldwide economy. >> last word? >> i think that at national levels both governments will continue to do what they do now, which is managed each others' expectations and manage tension. i think it's important for china to increase transparency, particularly on security issues and to let its intentions be more transparently known. i think when it comes to business they will be intensified competition as china moves up the value chain. and that means they will be intensified friction. you would expect that. the trading relationship is very large now and it's going to be much larger 10 years from now. and i think that chinese and americans will continue to share one common feature, and that is being pragmatic, being extremely practical, and that will hopefully form a foundation for a strong underlying relationship as these tensions are managed
'm not supposed to root for one candidate or another, but it's the government of indiana, i like him because he's 5 ft.'6",w to the ground, in touch with people, you have to be down there. i think he's been in an extremely effective governor at a time when state budgets have ballooned and gone up 40% state after state. in indiana, the debt has gone down 40%. at the same time, a lot of programs that republican matter have been improved. even wait times at the department of motor vehicle have dropped from 60 minutes to 8 minutes. i think he's been effective government. i think the government that the republicans would do well to counterprogram against the graceful, elegant and brilliant democrat that may not be charismatic, but knows how to run things. i think the other two are mitt romney and tim pawlenty. managers, i'm less enamored. pawlenty was a good governor, but i haven't seen as much management. i think republicans have two problems. the first is they to their credit and this is to obama's deficit, they are saying we have to tacklen titlements. that is a courageous step. because the gover
has not been done in a given area. i visited the fusion center in my state of indiana. i've done it in a couple other areas, and i think they represent probably the best hope for giving you the kind of response you want on unity of effort in any given crisis. >> i recognize the gently day from new york, ms. clark. i'm sorry, from michigan. >> thank you, mr. chair. my question to the entire panel is how can the department of homeland security best judge an urban area's risk of an attack based on the assessments used now? we have in large international airport hub in detroit. that airport was the destination of the plane that the christmas day bomber attempted to blow up, so there's some likelihood that our region could be the target of another attack. now, in addition to the likelihood of an attack, the department also needs to look at the consequences of an attack. metropoll tan detroit, i'll use that as an example, we have a large population center. we have a border that is water that is also the busiest international border crossing in terms of trade in north america. we also h
of indiana because the elders of my district of michigan businesses, come on down. and they did. so as i look at what we have to do on tax reform, we know we have to compete with other nations around the world. and i'm going to yield back to you and then give up some of my time. in the last congress who passed a currency manipulation milk into china, h.r. 2378. msi headline today and some of the news and some of the business groups were very cute errand but if this legislation came about again, it would perhaps lead to retaliation by chinese companies against american firms. i am wondering if you wanted a steady as to what the impacts of the chinese currency manipulation really means as it relates to u.s. businesses that export or involve in china. do i think i am not? >> we work with the congressional budget office on what we call indirect tax effects of nontax legislation. but i do not think that we did any work on the currency bill commissary. >> would it be possible to ask you -- do i do go through camp? >> we work for other matters of congress. i'm not that familiar with the legislation,
that member and mr. silva, the former member from davenport, for their leadership on indiana semitism as well as hoping us to coordinate the global summit here in january, and i'm pleased to nawns that this evening the minister of foreign affairs and i will be the first to sign the ottawa protocol indicating that canada will continue to take a leadership role in combating all forms of anti-semitism which seeks to target and vilify the collective view of the state of israel. [applause] >> the honorable member -- [inaudible] >> mr. speaker, there is no business case for abolishing the canadian wheat board, it's an ideological crusade clean and simple, and now the clear majority of canadian grain producers have voted to keep the single monopoly. i argue that the minister is both duty-bound and honor-bound to respect the very acts that defined his ministry which guarantees a vote of -- [inaudible] before the government interferes with their ability to market their grain. [applause] >> mr. speaker, the member site that the wheat board overtook left out a glaring hole in the middle, the right for f
. here are some of senator kyle's remarks on the floor today. then you'll hear from indiana republican senator dan coats. >> president obama is about to s rule out another jobs plan he talked about last week.irst this is two and a half years tfter the first stimulus billabu which with interest to about $1.2 trillion, and his economict advisers have confirmed the fact that this stimulus concept isd o economic theory, and as our republican leader noted last week, unfortunately there areico now 1.7 million fewer jobs in of america are according to theicsn bureau of labor statistics than president' before the president's first stimulus bill. so the question is whether it iy better in theory than it is in practice. and i wanted to talk today a littlebasi bit about the twocono different basic theories of a economic growth and when you doh in aav situation of economic downturn like we have today.stim how should we be looking at the stimulation of job creation and economic growth, the two competing theories of course are the keynesian theory that i mentioned and what some have called supply-si
featured in c-span's new weekly series, "the contenders." live from the debs' home in tear rah hot, indiana. get a preview and watch other videos about him at our special web site for the series, c-span.org/the contenders. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> yesterday the chief economist for the american bankers association said that the u.s. economy is this many a period of slow and painful growth citing unemployment and the housing market as problem areas. at a conference in washington, james chessen also criticized congress for waiting until after the next election to make tough fiscal decisions and expressed skepticism that the so-called congressional supercommittee would be able to address the deficit. this runs just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, paul.
political history. he's one of the 14 men featured c-span's new series, contenders in terre haute indiana. friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, watch some of our other videos that another special website for the series c-span.org/the contenders. >> translator: your xo answer is here with the presence of the general assembly. >> translator: presiding over the 65th session of the general assembly. all thanks also go to mr. ban ki-moon on his reelection as secretary general of the united nations. we express thanks and appreciation to him and the general has sense retired staff efforts over the past year, and in particular, his follow-up of the situation in our country. ladies and gentlemen, we wish to congratulate the people of the republic of south sudan on the exsession of that republic of the united nations. we wish also to congratulate the transitional counsel in libya for their counsel among us and the representation of the libyan people. my country has be witnessing this since last january, a key political crisis. the political opposition that has been one the plain establishments in yemen sin
's indiana, please go ahead. >> caller: thank you for your wonderful book. i was thinking of the relationship of ellen's three daughters. i read some of the first lady display that the figure of the second mrs. wilson wasn't worthy to be displayed next to the figure of her mother, ellen wilson. could you comment, please? >> yes. i don't know about that comment. i've never run across it so i don't know which daughter it was. edith had a somewhat contentious relationship with the youngest daughter from time to time. although at the end of her life they made up and were very cozy with each other. but ellen wilson had not wanted an inaugural ball. she didn't approve. she was a very sober, intellectual woman. she thought it was extravagant to have an inaugural ball. she thought it demedian the presidency to have a commercial event around it. so i don't think she had an inaugural gown. so she may have said that it was more important for her mother's gown to be there than edith's but i don't know which gown they would have used, frankly. >> when did edith wilson die? >> edith wilson died in 1961. sh
-grown misstate that china is an example of a country and also you have a lot of discussion at indiana, of countries that are engaged in the overconsumption, short-term political. >> guest: that's exactly right. 50 years of economic folly in stark choices ahead. america does have stark choices to make. and he needs to focus on making those choices so you can remain a preeminent economy. just as an analogy come as somebody said to me is sort of like the green bay packers. your number one. you win a super bowl. in order to stay there, focus on your own team dynamics. make sure it's the best it can be. if you start focusing on the guy snapping at your heels as number two, you can get overly focused and what they're doing in u.k. to the super bowl. i think that's a message for the united states. the problems we have right now, education, budget. china plays a role in tangentially, but it's not the core issue with respect to infrastructure. it is about what america is doing wrong. solve those problems in the remain competitive. if you don't involve province, china might even do some relativ
, and representative andre carson, democrat of indiana, of indianapolis made this comment recently. i want to get your reaction. >> we have seen change in congress. the tea party itself has changed. this is beyond symbolic change. this is the effort that we are seeing of jim crow. >> host: ellis cose? traneighty we are looking at political rhetoric here, and political rhetoric seems to be n'treme. political rhetoric tends to be a little extreme.term i don't think that certainly in terms of their articulated what positions come you're going to find any tea party leadership's saying we want people whiche together. it's just not part of their. ar rhetoric.er and i think many of them aree et sincere about that. diff they recognize this is ao te different america that you can't take america back to the 1940s and 1950s.y ar at the same time come with the express as frustrated.it in. they're not quite sure what this thing is going and they are mo angry. host: in your book, "mans world," how high is its price went what did you find that male americans were frustrated by? >> guest: it's interesting. segue from
of georgia has, alabama has, utah has, indiana has. and in each of those cases, courts well, except for alabama, in those cases courts have enjoined the enforcement on the act of the doctrine of preemption. alabama has stayed its decision while it further studies the question but no court has upheld one of these statutes. the national association of state legislatures, the national state counsel legislatures say many states have major immigration legislation pending so there's an obvious need for guidance. the one caveat i would offer this involves a question of preemption? the issue is not racial profiling and a lot of public discussion centers on that but the issue on these cases is whether or not these laws are consistent with federal statutes. and the court might well think that congress is going to get around to addressing this issue and it's congress that ought to be providing the guidance. so with that caveat in mind that the court might decide to sort of sit back for a while and see if congress does anything, the other factors would seem overwhelmingly to indicate the court
to understand why your -- why they're acting that way towards a student. host: from kokomo, indiana. bob on the republican line. caller: i am 41-years-old, and my mom was surprised to find out a couple of months ago that i pretty much at all levels in school. she asked why she never knew about it. i said i threw down. i took it back to them and did not allow it. i am just trying to figure out where we went wrong. why did this become such a big issue? the calller from new jersey, i do not know what is going on, she must be sending her sson to school wearing a dress or something. when did this become such an issue? why do we have three different call-in lines. republicans, democrats, and independence? guest: in terms of what we want to recommend that kids do? i think you bring up the issue that many kids do recommend to their kids to fight back or bully back or hit back. sadly, that is not effective strategy. it can increase the risk of harm or both parties when the victim of grasses back in that way. we get into trouble as well it can get suspended -- they can get into trouble as well or
at them is not the answer. >> host: a couple minutes left. john, independent from indiana. john, good morning, you're on the air. >> caller: hello? >> host: yes, we can hear you. >> caller: okay. when is the smoke screen going to come down? you know, our economy is not stuttering because of taxes. our economy is suffering. we have 14 million people out of work. we've got a poverty rate of 15% now, and it all boils down to the wto treaties that we're giving our jobs away to china, and this jobs bill here has three more fair trade deals in it. why doesn't anybody address the real issue on if everybody that was working and paying taxes and 40-some thousand or 40 million factories still working here in the united states, we would not have a tax problem. thank you very much. >> guest: well, i think there's a distinction between sort of long term trends and the immediate crisis. you know, the reason the unemployment numbers are spiking this week -- you know, that is not particularly because of jobs moving overseas. that's a long term trend, and we have to look at the currency manipulation a
, but the uprising of working women and men in wisconsin, indiana and ohio signals a rebirth of the great coalition that still provides our best hope for real and lasting change. i believe that we can adapt the great traditions that animated the union and civil rights movements in the 20th century to forge a vibrant, new spirit of militancy and a culture of organizing empowered by the latest communications technology. so let us link arms as brothers and sisters, united and determined to put an end to the war against workers and the unjust harassment of latino workers and their families. let's join forces with an unshakable spirit of solidarity for jobs and economic justice. let's reach out to one another and build a great multicultural coalition on a scale never before seen in this nation. let's serve notice that we're not going to be discouraged by political obstructionists. we are not going to be deterred by the citizens united decision, and we're not going to be turned around by any detractors. but with our faith in each other, with our shared vision of hope and opportunity and with our irrevers
to help disaster victims. i'm going to read a letter written by the members of the indiana delegation, at least three republicans have signed this letter. senator lugar from indiana, representative dan burton from indiana and representative mike pence from indiana. they wrote on june 25, "we write today to highlight the remarkable automotive innovation occurring in indiana and the tremendous potential for hooshors lead our national effort in transforming the automotive sector. indiana is uniquely qualified and prepared to lead the nation and the world in the development and commercialization of advanced patry, electric-drive vehicles and other innovative transportation technologies. hoosiers are committed to reaching our national goal of reducing our dependence on foreign oil and they are actively-reaching, developing manufacturing technologies that will be clean are and create lasting jobs. the hoosier state is the most manufacturing-intensive state in the union. it's now home to some 700 automotive-related companies which employ more than 130,000 workers. moreover, indiana's broad d
it is visiting a high school in indiana, until the next 45 minutes we will hear from 15 students participating in the program. the high school is located in northwest indiana, and over 1000 students attend. thank you for preparing the students for the call in, and comcast cable for sponsoring the visit. our first student is jesse. >> how would you suggest to financially restore the united states postal service besides cutting back employment and benefits? guest: we think it is simple. there will be a slow, gradual change in the post office that needs to be done. we recognize there are people that will not use the post office and probably never use it again, but there is $65 billion of revenue by people that are utilizing the postal service. they should be done gradually. they should be done humanely, was consideration of the poor communities and rural areas, so they did not lose their service. that could be done by using these over-funding, the money ained.as been dreame that is the humane way of doing this. you have to remember, if you read a post office with two hundred or 300 employees, it
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